Wickedness of govern-ment

Here is just one example of absolute evil and the inversion of Reality within the legal realm; man’s law, Satan’s world, hell.

In setting up a fiction, the law requires us to take an actual situation and imagine it to be different from what it really is, either by thinking of nonexistent elements as added to it or by thinking of existing elements as removed from it, so as to permit the application of legal maxims which refer only to the situation as thus transformed. Its purpose in doing this is to make it possible to decide cases according to analogy when a direct ruling does not apply. The whole nature of legal fictions is determined by this purpose, and they are sustained only so far as it requires. The legislator and the judge always remain aware that the fictitious situation does not correspond to reality. So it is also with the so-called dogmatic fiction that is employed in jurisprudence to permit legal facts to be systematically classified and related to each other. Here again, the situation is thought of as existing, but it is not assumed to exist.“— The Theory Of Money And Credit by LUDWIG VON MISES

“legal fiction
nsomething asssumed in law to be fact irrespective of the truth or accuracy of that assumption.”— Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law, 1996

“legal fiction:
a rule assuming as true something that is clearly false. A fiction is often used to get around the provisions of constitutions and legal codes that legislators are hesitant to change or to encumber with specific limitations. Thus, when a legislature has no legal power to sit beyond a certain midnight but has five hours more of work still to do, it is easier to turn back the official clock from time to time than it is to change the law or constitution.

In ancient Rome, where every family needed a male heir, the lack of one was overcome through the legal fiction of adoption. In England, when courts handling civil cases were full, the Court of Queen’s (or King’s) Bench, a criminal court, could take some of the load by pretending that the defendant in a simple civil suit had been arrested and was in custody.

Almost any legal fiction can be stated in terms of fact. Thus, the fiction that a corporation is, for many purposes, a person separate from its members is equivalent to saying that, for those purposes, the law deals with the group as a unit, disregarding for the moment the group’s individual members as such.”— Universalium, 2010

“Res judicata facit ex albo nigrum, ex nigro album, ex curvo rectum, ex recto curvum. A thing adjudged makes what was white, black; what was black, white; what was crooked straight; what was straight, crooked.” — Bouvier’s Law Dictionary Adapted To The Constitution of the United States, 1856

Woe to those who call evil good, and good evil;
Who substitute darkness for light and light for darkness;
Who substitute bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter!
“— Isa 5:20

Legal maxims are essentially foundational rules the magi-strates and legislators follow when administrating their artifice. This Beast System needs wickedness to live, for if they are made to adhere to actual Truths of Reality, instead of playing pretend adhering to fictions and artifice, the legitimacy of its sorcery would dwindle and fail.

Welcome to the ‘baly’. I hope you like enduring ‘danger’.

“BALY.
(1) Evil; sorrow.
(4) Dominion; government.”

“DANGERE.
(1) Lordship, or dominion; the power which the feudal lord has over his vassals.”— A Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words: Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs, and Ancient Customs, from the XIV Century, 1904

“danger (n.)
mid-13c., daunger, “arrogance, insolence;” c. 1300, “power of a lord or master, jurisdiction,” from Anglo-French daunger, Old French dangier “power, power to harm, mastery, authority, control” (12c., Modern French danger), alteration (due to association with damnum) of dongier, from Vulgar Latin *dominarium “power of a lord,” from Latin dominus “lord, master,” from domus “house” (from PIE root *dem- “house, household”).”— https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=danger

“VASSAL
2. A subject; a dependent.”— Webster’s 1828 Dictionary
[Citizens are considered subjects. The term “nationals” is now used in place of “subjects” according to American Law and Procedure: Constitutional Law Vol. 12]

“… it is to be noticed that the term subject is capable of a different and wider application, in which it includes all members of the body politic, whether they are citizens (i.e., subjects stricto sensu) or resident aliens. All such persons are subjects, all being subject to the power of the state and to its jurisdiction, and as owing to it, at least temporarily, fidelity and obedience.”— Black’s Law 9th

“MAGISTRATE
A public civil officer, invested with the executive government or some branch of it. In this sense, a king is the highest or first magistrate as is the President of the United States. But the word is more particularly applied to subordinate officers, as governors, intendants, prefects, mayors, justices of the peace, and the like.”— Webster’s 1828 Dictionary